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Wife, Mother, Pastor

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HOW TO KEEP YOUR PASTOR BOSS

Yes, I said keep your boss. Lately I’ve noticed quite a few articles tilted, “How to keep your employees.” Or “How to Keep Your Volunteers.” These are good articles and are important qualities for those of us in leadership. However, in our entitled society we are awful supporters. A society that treats our bosses with disrespect, gossip behind their backs and when asked why we quit the answer is, “My boss was mean.”

In 1 Samuel 14, we see Jonathan’s armor-bearer right by his side giving him support in attacking the Philistines. The Israelites were discouraged, outnumbered and not properly armed (except Jonathan and Saul). Jonathan went to the Philistine outpost and told his armor-bearer, “Come, let’s go over to the outpost . . . Perhaps the Lord will work on our behalf …”

His armor-bearer could have turned back.  He could have told Jonathan he was crazy.  But he didn’t. To this request his armor-bearer said he would do what Jonathan had in mind and declared, “I will be with you heart and soul.”
Jonathan and his armor-bearer alone killed twenty Philistines in that attack.  He served along side Jonathan and helped him in victory.

If you’re a staff pastor then your lead pastor is obviously your boss. Lead pastors do need to know how to lead and train you, but we are responsible for ourselves and should be striving to be good armor-bearers. Our job as armor-bearers is to make our boss’s job easier, not harder.

I probably have the best pastor boss in the world. Though we’ve had conflict, God has used him to help mold and shape me.  They are not called to battle alone, and we were not called to be on the sidelines. We are called to help our leaders to victory.

Here’s how we can honor and bless our boss today:

BE THANKFUL- The bible says we are to not complain so we can shine like stars (Phil 2:14-15). When we are thankful and grateful our hearts begin to soften and we begin to change. This in turn not only helps our boss, but helps us be a witness to unbelievers.

LISTEN- People come to your boss all the time wanting advice or looking to get their problems solved. As we are all called to share ‘one another’s burdens’ I have to wonder who is sharing his/hers. If they begin to share with you, just listen. I learned a long time ago in ministry that not everyone wants advice. They just need to clear their heads by talking. Be that good listener, not that good talker.  When was the last time you sincerely asked how they were doing?

CUT OFF GOSSIP- Depending on what church you attend and the demographic, your pastor boss may get gossiped about. A LOT. The last thing he/she needs is their staff condoning it. One, gossip is a sin and two, it brings him/her dishonor. If you catch wind of it, or if someone wants to come to you with a problem about them, cut off the gossip and direct them right back the boss him/herself. That’s who they need to be having the conversation with, not you.

SHOW APPRECIATION- This is a rule I use with those who work underneath of me as well. We as humans need encouragement and affirmation, and we as humans should be showing it. Is their birthday coming up? Anyone can write a last minute FB post, send them an actual card. You know their favorite candy or fancy coffee? Buy it for them. Or send them a plain thank you note for how they are teaching and growing you.

PRAY FOR THEM- How often are you praying for your pastor boss and their family? We know there is power in prayer. Not only do they need it, but if we have issues with them it will soften our hearts and get us to where we need to be too.

We are not called to sit on the sidelines, but to help our boss fight the good fight that leads to victory.  Remember- you maybe that boss someday.

PRAY WITH ME SISTERS
“Lord, I thank you for my boss. I thank you that I get to be their armor-bearer. Show me how I can best listen, show appreciation and pray for my authority. Help me to bring respect and honor to them and to make their job easier. Lead them into victory. In Jesus name, Amen.”

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